Category Archives: Fishing

Reveling at the Chill, the Rain

Gotta go to sleep, early shift tomorrow, but hearing what sounds like a few drops outside my window in south #Burnaby makes me happy.

Yes, I’m happy at the chill in the air, and the looming precipitation. Rain means salmon are coming. . .

All ya folks out there sad at the rain and the dark, get thee back outside, and feel, touch, smell the season.

Autumn is glorious, especially here in the lower mainland of BC.

Nighty night.

Canadian Govt Seeks Input on Strengthening Enviro/Regulatory Reviews

If you’re involved in environmental issues in Canada in any way, be it as a volunteer, consultant, NGO staff member, etc., you may be interested in contributing feedback to this discussion paper.

Environmental and Regulatory Reviews: Discussion Paper

Purpose

Our Government is committed to deliver environmental assessment and regulatory processes that regain public trust, protect the environment, introduce modern safeguards, advance reconciliation with Indigenous peoples, ensure good projects go ahead, and resources get to market.

We made this commitment because we share common concerns about the ability of Canada’s environmental assessment and regulatory processes to protect and sustain the natural environment while getting resources to market and creating good, middle class jobs for Canadians. In the current system:

  • There is a need for greater transparency around the science, data and evidence supporting decisions and to ensure Indigenous knowledge is sufficiently taken into account;
  • Protections to Canada’s fisheries and waterways are insufficient; and,
  • Indigenous peoples and the public should have more opportunities to meaningfully participate.

This discussion paper outlines the changes our Government is considering for Canada’s environmental assessment and regulatory processes that will:

  • Regain public trust;
  • Protect the environment;
  • Advance reconciliation with Indigenous peoples; and,
  • Ensure good projects go ahead and resources get to market.

Government is seeking feedback on this discussion paper.

Camping at Ten Mile Lake Provincial Park

I tacked a few days on to my trip to Quesnel for SEP2017, the BC-wide streamkeepers workshop, so that I could relax and camp for a couple of days. Here are some shots from the road trip, and  a lovely stay at Ten Mile Lake Provincial Park. All of these photos were taken with my new Canon SX720HS.

Quesnel road trip Ten Mile Lake
Here’s an example of the amazing 40X optical zoom, from widest to the telephoto limit.


The view a few steps from my campsite


Killdeer


Loon

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White-winged Scoter at Ten Mile Lake north of Quesnel, BC. This is the first time I’ve seen this bird.


One of humankind’s greatest inventions :-). The folding chair with built-in cup holder.


OK, so I got a pack of dogs at Wal-Mart for $2.99, but at least I paired them with a baguette!


At the campfire wearing my Vancouver Half-Marathon T from a few years back. Hot dogs and beer — the athletes dinner. . .


Lots of trout jumping in the lake


The view from the fishing-only dock


There were several frogs near the boat launch


I admired this cute furball — it didn’t solicit any treats from me, just happily munched away on a healthy natural diet

DFO Community Advisor’s Last Fish Release on Burnaby’s Byrne Creek

Kids from Clinton Elementary in south Burnaby helped Byrne Creek Streamkeepers volunteers and DFO release coho smolts (yearling salmon) in Byrne Creek today.

It was a bittersweet event, as it was the last release on Byrne with retiring DFO Community Advisor Maurice Coulter-Boisvert.

But we’re very happy that long-time tech Scott is taking over Maurice’s role. Looking forward to working with you!

Byrne Creek coho smolt release
DFO and City of Burnaby staff share a laugh. It was that kind of uplifting day, and event, eh?


Byrne Creek Streamkeepers stalwart and Stream of Dreams co-founder Joan helps connect the kids to nature


Maurice on the salmon life cycle


Joan demonstrates proper fish release technique


Lining up to take fish down to the creek. The excitement is palpable. . . : – )


Netting coho smolts out of the tank, and putting them in baggies for the kids


Helping hands guide excited kids for a safe release


Look at them go!


Volunteer Ray points out how the fish quickly change color to match their new surroundings


They are so beautiful. Thanks so much to the volunteers at Kanaka Creek who raise these cuties!


Don’t mess with this crew : -)

Spring Bug Count on Byrne Creek

Byrne Creek Streamkeepers Society volunteers sampled nine sites on the creek today for bugs — AKA aquatic invertebrates. The types and quantities of bugs found are an indicator of water quality.

Byrne Creek Bug Counting
After the bugs are collected using D-nets, we retire to a volunteer’s home to count in comfort, accompanied by coffee, tea, and muffins.


Caddisfly


Growing collection of mayflies


A cool aquatic snail

Ode to a Knife

OK, let’s get one thing clear off the top. I love this knife, but I’m not homicidal. I just have a long history with this sturdy implement, and I admire its durability.

It’s a US Boy Scouts sheath knife circa 1970. I bought it when I was living in New York City, and was active with the local troop in my ‘hood, so it’s at least 45 years old.

It’s all original, including the leather sheath.

It has been much used, and, for a knife, abused. As you can surmise in the scars in the detailed photos below, it’s pounded nails, stripped 14/2  wiring, split kindling when an axe was not available and a rock was used to pound the blade into the wood. . . In addition to more “knifely” duties such as cleaning fish.

And it’s still solid, still takes a good edge, and will long outlive me. I may ask to have it buried with me when I depart, just in case there are zombies on the other side :-).

If you check the BSA online store, it appears nothing like this is available anymore.

I still take it hiking and camping, though I’ve retired it from streamkeeping — I have an excellent, inexpensive, plastic-handled stainless-steel knife from MEC for that duty now.

Beauty, eh?

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1960s US Boy Scouts Sheath Knife

Coho Smolt Release on Byrne Creek in SE Burnaby, BC

Kids from Glenwood Elementary, volunteers from the Byrne Creek Streamkeepers Society, and DFO Community Advisor Maurice Coulter-Boisvert released coho smolts in Byrne Creek in SE Burnaby this morning. Great to have help from City of Burnaby staff, too!

A few shots of the fun:

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DFO CA Maurice

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Talking salmon life cycle

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Netting smolts in the transport tank

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City of Burnaby staff help fill baggies of fish for the kids

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Handing out baggies of fish

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Streamkeeper volunteers supervise releases

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A lovely coho smolt

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After the kids had to leave to get back to school, we released the rest of the salmon in the artificial spawning channel

Byrne Creek coho smolt release