Category Archives: Business

You Don’t Have to Hit a Homer for a Sense of Accomplishment

Chipping away. . .

People often set big goals. While laudable, I’m not sure that’s always the best way to get things done, chalk up accomplishments, and just plain feel good about yourself, particularly when it comes to projects that take less than a month, a week, or even a day.

Recently I’ve been trying smaller steps, in greater frequency, and it feels good.

Today after work I:

  • cleaned and organized my desk in my home office and can now see 2/3 of the surface
  • cleaned and organized my side desk and can now see 2/3 of the surface
  • got rid of stuff that had sat untouched for years in several desk drawers
  • shredded about 1/3 of a legal-size filing-cabinet drawer of financial records that were well past the date of potential interest to the authorities
  • filled a banker’s box to overflowing with old magazines and put it in the garage to place in recycling
  • filled another banker’s box with books to donate
  • did a load of laundry
  • . . . and so forth.

None of these activities took more than 15-20 minutes each, but it all added up. I could have gone further into the filing cabinets, but why kill myself? Lots more shredding in there to feel good about over the next several days : -).

 

Completed Standard First Aid for Industry

I completed a St. John Ambulance (Burnaby branch) Standard First Aid for Industry with CPR/AED course and certification over the weekend.

Thanks to Danni, a superb instructor, who was very knowledgeable, down to earth, and fun.

I’m zonked now — it was an intense two days, but also happy to have refreshed my first-aid knowledge. I hadn’t taken a formal first-aid course since my youth, in Red Cross swimming classes and Boy Scouts, several decades ago.

Love My Old Subaru When it Comes to Bits of Home Repair

Amazing how synchronized replacing parts can be. Over the last month I’ve replaced first, one headlight; next, one turn signal bulb; and today, another headlight.

Thank goodness our pushing-20-years-old Subaru is of an age when that sort of stuff is easy to access for the home mechanic.

I know folks with “modern” vehicles who’ve had to have headlights replaced by dealers at $300 a pop because of the way they’re assembled.

Checking Out the Q to Q Ferry Trial

We took a ride on the Q to Q ferry service in New Westminster, BC, today. It’s a trial on for a couple of months. It was fun, and we also enjoyed rambling around Port Royal, where we’d never been before.

https://www.newwestcity.ca/qtoqferry

Q to Q Ferry Trial New Westminster
New Westminster waterfront


Running on weekends now


High-tech fare box works great!


The Fraser lives up to its moniker as a “working river.”


Even on a warm summer day it can be breezy and cool on the river


Ran across the fireworks barge


The old Samson V is looking rather rough. Wonder what its preservation status is?

Editors Canada Supports NYT Copy Editors

Proud that Editors Canada supports NYT copy editors, at least in spirit!

editors canada supports NYT copy editors

Dear copy editors of The New York Times:

The Editors’ Association of Canada (Editors Canada) wishes to express our support for you as The New York Times plans to drastically reduce its copy editing staff.

As your colleagues north of the border, we appreciate your efforts to bring much-needed attention to the importance of the profession of copy editor. As editing professionals, we know that the copy editor’s role is crucial. Without the copy editor, a huge range of errors can all too easily slip into print—not only spelling, grammar and punctuation mistakes, but factual errors, biased language, unclear passages and other problems, all of which can seriously undermine the credibility and effectiveness of a piece of writing. The result is not only unprofessional, but could lead to legal action against the publisher. While copy editors tend to be invisible, their work is indispensable.

We wish you well as you continue to speak out about the value of the copy editor in the publishing process, and we hope for a positive outcome for your current situation.

Sincerely,

Anne Louise Mahoney
Certified Professional Editor
President, Editors Canada
president@editors.ca

http://www.editors.ca/news/editors-canada-supports-copy-editors-new-york-times

Canadian Govt Seeks Input on Strengthening Enviro/Regulatory Reviews

If you’re involved in environmental issues in Canada in any way, be it as a volunteer, consultant, NGO staff member, etc., you may be interested in contributing feedback to this discussion paper.

Environmental and Regulatory Reviews: Discussion Paper

Purpose

Our Government is committed to deliver environmental assessment and regulatory processes that regain public trust, protect the environment, introduce modern safeguards, advance reconciliation with Indigenous peoples, ensure good projects go ahead, and resources get to market.

We made this commitment because we share common concerns about the ability of Canada’s environmental assessment and regulatory processes to protect and sustain the natural environment while getting resources to market and creating good, middle class jobs for Canadians. In the current system:

  • There is a need for greater transparency around the science, data and evidence supporting decisions and to ensure Indigenous knowledge is sufficiently taken into account;
  • Protections to Canada’s fisheries and waterways are insufficient; and,
  • Indigenous peoples and the public should have more opportunities to meaningfully participate.

This discussion paper outlines the changes our Government is considering for Canada’s environmental assessment and regulatory processes that will:

  • Regain public trust;
  • Protect the environment;
  • Advance reconciliation with Indigenous peoples; and,
  • Ensure good projects go ahead and resources get to market.

Government is seeking feedback on this discussion paper.

Canada Day Weekend Depletes Canadian Stock of Kindness, Politeness

It’s back to work, grumpy people!

I wanted to buy some hiking socks. At the first sporting goods store I went to I was quietly regarding the racks, when a staff member came by, snorted, and said:

“Why would you want to buy those socks? These are the ones you should be looking at,” pointing to ones costing three times more per pair.

I said I’d been happy with a certain combo of layered liner and thick socks for over 40 years of hiking. That didn’t deter his disdain, or his prattle, so I walked out.

The next store I went to, it was clear sailing until the end. Nobody approached me, I had quiet time to myself to peruse the labels, checking the proportions of poly to wool to whatever. . . Bliss.

Then — accosted at the checkout. “Sir, if you sign up for Partner Credit Card today, I can give you 20% off your entire purchase.”

“I don’t want any more credit cards, and anyway, I have this 10% discount coupon which will do me just fine.”

“But sir, I can issue a paper credit card right now, which you can use to get 20% off. . .”

“What’s a paper credit card? How do I pay it off?”

“We’ll send you a bill in the mail, or you can go straight over to Partner Store, and pay it today.”

Right, sucked further into Database Nation. No thanks.

“But sir!”

“I said, no thanks.” Poor kid slumps away, and checkout clerk glares at me.

After these wee contretemps, I’m feeling hungry, and notice a Subway nearby. I walk in, and say “I’d like a footlong turkey on Italian.”

“What kind of bread?” Italian. “How large?” Footlong. “Was that turkey?” Yes. [Silently to myself — Earth to counter person??]

Another fellow walks in.

“Hi!” says the cashier cheerfully.

He says, “I’d like a. . .”

“Sorry, sir, you have to start your order from the other end of the counter.”

“So why did you say hi to me at this end?”

Oy. . .