US Charging Ahead on Enviro Issues, Canada Stuck in the 50s

I’ve been attending the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference, and as at previous ones, I am yet again in awe of coordinated volunteer – municipal – tribal (in Canada First Nations) – state – federal conservation efforts in the US.

Yes, we like to slag our southern neighbours for many things, but they are way ahead of us on many others.

Canada? We’re doing good here and there, but we suck at coordinated action. And in Canada, for the last decade at least, the burden has increasingly fallen on volunteers, with federal and provincial governments abdicating their responsibilities, and slashing enviro-related staff and funding.

A major hurt is that Canada is still so 20th century. To see the ruling-party hydroelectric dam platform in BC is to read something from the 1950s.

The US is demolishing dams, setting rivers, wildlife and salmon free, unleashing renewable, long-term natural and economic potential along the way.

Here in Canada, our governments still want to pour concrete in pristine rivers and flood massive areas of our most productive farmland and traditional First Nations hunting and fishing territories.

Shame.

Green/Blue initiatives will provide jobs.

Lusting for a Nikon D500

I’m in lust for a new Nikon D500 DSLR.  Based on specs this would be an amazing wildlife camera. Huge usable ISOs, blazing motor drive, prescient focus and exposure systems…

I think it may be time to sell some older Nikon gear, and sign up for the latest and greatest.

I think I’ll keep my aging D300, not much money to be made from that, and it’s still a solid camera. I use it with some of my ancient all-manual Nikkor lenses. And it was my first DSLR, so there are the emotional ties. (Just like I’m hanging on to my film Nikon F2 though I haven’t shot film in over a decade… Memories : -)

I think the one to go is the mid-range D5200. It’s served me well for a couple of years, but it doesn’t cut the pro mustard in usability. It has great resolution for its price class, but it’s not an action camera. Too much stuff is buried in menus that semi-pro and pro models have more to hand with extra buttons. I hate having to click through screen menus when I want to change something quickly in the field.

Bonus? If I’m reading specs right, a D500 would use the same batteries as my D7100 and D7200. Wow!

Chum Fry Release on Byrne Creek in Burnaby

It was a soggy day for a chum fry release on Byrne Creek in SE Burnaby, but three classes of kids from Taylor Park Elementary were in high spirits. It’s always a blast releasing these wee fish.

chum fry release byrne creek
DFO Community Advisor Maurice talks salmon

byrne creek chum fry release

byrne creek chum fry release

byrne creek chum fry release
Leading the kids up to the tank

byrne creek chum fry release
DFO tech Scott prepares baggies

byrne creek chum fry release
Netting fry out of the tank

byrne creek chum fry release

byrne creek chum fry release

byrne creek chum fry release
Volunteer John directs traffic

byrne creek chum fry release
Volunteers Ray, Lori, Rob, and Murray, assist in release technique

byrne creek chum fry release

byrne creek chum fry release

byrne creek chum fry release

byrne creek chum fry release

byrne creek chum fry release

byrne creek chum fry release

byrne creek chum fry release

byrne creek chum fry release
Scott’s done hundreds of such releases yet look at that grin!

byrne creek chum fry release

byrne creek chum fry release
Yep, the fish was really this big 🙂

Streamkeeping, sustainability, community, business, photography, books, and animals, with occasional forays into social commentary. Text and Photos © Paul Cipywnyk