Category Archives: Travel

Beasts Enjoy White Rock Sunrise

I woke up at 4:30 this morning, and figured I might as well get out and enjoy the sunrise. But where? Thought the White Rock, BC, pier and Crescent Beach would be nice, and was rewarded for driving down.


There were several Great Blue Herons


Seal off the boat slip

heron gull seal white rock


Looking back up the pier

White Rock sunrsie
The view to the west


The view to the east


Crescent Beach


Looking north from Crescent Beach toward Vancouver

Thanks For the Conversation

I was out shooting for a photo project today, and as evening approached, I got myself a cold drink and sat down in a public square to ease my feet and back.

As I unwound, an older fellow pushing a four-wheeler came along. He saw me festooned with cameras and began asking questions.

Sigh. . .

Yes, that was my initial reaction, but then I thought, I’m done for the day, what’s it going to hurt to chat for a few minutes.

Wise decision, Paul.

We shook hands and introduced ourselves.

He was a world traveler and raconteur. He was a photography buff, and we began by discussing what made a good photo — good equipment or a good photographer. We agreed on the later. A good start.

We went back in time to the beginnings of photography, and he knew the inventors, and the dates. We talked paper-backed mid-format roll film.

He recommended a few photo shows that he’d seen recently, and panned a couple, too.

Turned out we’d traveled to many of the same places, but a few decades apart. And he’d traveled to lots of interesting places that I’d never been to. It also turned out we’d even done some similar work over the years. This was good!

He asked if I was retired, and I said, no, that I’d been working on a project today. I gave him my business card, and my volunteer streamkeepers card, and his eyes lit up. Turns out he was proud to support environmental causes.

The plaza was taking on a warm orange glow as the sun moved lower in the sky, and he positioned his wheeler, slowly got himself up and behind it, and said he’d better be moving on.

We shook hands again, and he said, “don’t get old, Paul.”

Damn.

Never underestimate your elders.

P.S. Since we’re first-time acquaintances, I’m not going to share his name. But I hope to meet him again some day. . .

Victoria Coast and Ferry

Some more shots as we headed up to the ferry from Victoria, BC, after last weekend’s SEHAB meeting.

Victoria BC coast
Coast watcher. . .


Lots of deer right in town


Views of Mt. Baker in WA


Heading down to the shore to check out tide pools


A moody evening on the ferry back to the mainland


Rain — that means we must be getting close to home : – )

Thanks, Baba, for the Embroidery – Still Miss You

One of the themes at the recent Editors Canada 2018 Conference in Saskatoon, SK, was indigenous issues, and several indigenous writers and editors spoke about the importance of “remember where you come from.”

This is where I come from.

Baba Ukrainian embroidery cemetary

An aunt found this embroidery, obviously meant for a Ukrainian men’s shirt, and she thought Baba must have embroidered it for me. So my aunt insisted that I take it, and when Yumi and I later drove up to the family farm, we visited Baba’s grave and I thanked her.

She lived a tough pioneer life for many of her years, and yet she had love and comfort for all.

And in the packet. . . It’s like she just walked away from it minutes ago . . .

Baba's Ukriainian embroidery needles and thread

Camping at Lac Le Jeune, BC

I stayed one night at Lac Le Jeune Provincial Park on my way out to Saskatchewan.

cow calf black bear
This cow and calf were keeping an eye on this black bear in the southern interior, apparently without too much concern.


Road in to lake covered in high water


Dock


Setting up camp

camping lac le jeune
Night falls

loon
Early morning loon

OtterOtter?

Consequences of Car Crash Drag on for Weeks

A fellow ran a stop sign and T-boned our car nearly two weeks ago, and the recovery process is still dragging on. Thankfully it’s “recovery” as in getting life back to normal, not “recovery” as in being injured. I was fine, but our trusty 1998 Subaru Outback ended up being written off by the insurance company.

Dealings with the Insurance Corporation of BC have been great. Staff have been calm, courteous and helpful. While we’re not happy that it was decided to write our vehicle off, we understand there’s not much to be done for a nearly 20-year-old car, no matter how well we’d maintained it over the years. Unfortunately, we’re unlikely to get more than a few thousand dollars for it, but we’ll push for the most. I’m collating maintenance records, and bills of recent purchases of value like snow tires, new battery, etc.

Our insurance for replacement vehicle coverage will run out this week, so we have to get on with getting a new(er) car. ICBC extended the rental coverage by nearly a week because they’ve been inundated and haven’t provided us with a buyout yet.

So we’re shopping for a new vehicle, and while that’s exciting in some ways, it’s also stressful. All sorts of decisions to make like new vs used, cash vs finance vs lease, etc.

We’re pretty much settled on what we want. I want another AWD (all-wheel drive) vehicle. I loved the Subbie’s performance in winter conditions. My wife wants a hybrid, and unfortunately Subaru has none available in Canada.

You put “hybrid” and “AWD” together, and the result is Toyota RAV4 Hybrid, for the most part. There may be a few others that fit those parameters, but they’re too big  or even more expensive.

We test drove a 2018 RAV4 Hybrid yesterday, and it seemed huge compared to our old Outback.  Mind you a new Outback is also huge compared to the models several generations ago.

We’ve also considered used RAV4s, but it appears you’d save at most three or four thousand dollars if getting a recent “Certified Used” hybrid, so why not go new and get a full warranty, more financing options, etc.

Looking forward to getting this all settled as soon as possible!

98 Outback towed away
Saying goodbye to our faithful companion of nearly 20 years.

Lots of memories associated with this car.

Both of my late parents were still alive when we got it. It transported hutches, dining room tables, coffee tables, armchairs. . .

My wife and I did dozens of trips across western Canada over the years. Many camping and canoeing trips. . . North as far as Kitimat, west to Tofino and Long Beach, east as far as Brandon, south as far as LA and Joshua Tree. . .