Category Archives: Nature

Birding at Deer Lake, Blossoms

I attended a birding tour around Burnaby BC’s Deer Lake today led by master birder George Clulow. It was a crisp, sunny morning, and great fun. There was plenty to see, but I ended up splitting my photography efforts between birds and blossoms, since I’d decided not to shlep the heavy artillery for the two-hour walk. It’s hard getting a decent hummingbird shot without the big lens and tripod.

deer lake heron in flight
The heron rookery. Here’s one carrying material for a nest

deer lake mallards
Mallard couple at the east beach

wigeons deer lake
American Wigeon couple at the east beach

Deer Lake mallards
Snoozing mallards at the east beach

frog deer lake
Frog in the lake, likely invasive

deer lake turtles
Turtles in the lake. They all look like invasive red-eared sliders, though one may not be

deer lake sparrow
Sparrow in the gardens near the Burnaby Art Gallery

deer lake blossoms

deer lake blossoms

deer lake blossoms

deer lake blossoms

deer lake blossoms

deer lake rhodos

deer lake rhodos

SFU Education Students Tour Byrne Creek

I had a great time on this glorious afternoon taking about a dozen students studying education at Simon Fraser University on a tour of Byrne Creek in SE Burnaby.

They had their own questions and activities related to community sustainability. I provided them with an overview of what volunteer streamkeepers do, and how we relate to the broader community through umbrella organizations, the municipality, and DFO.

SFU students tour Byrne Creek

SFU students tour Byrne Creek

Lots of Coho Fry in Byrne Creek in SE Burnaby today

coho fry Byrne CreekI spent about two hours this afternoon stalking salmon fry in Byrne Creek in SE Burnaby, BC. I saw dozens of wee coho throughout the areas that I checked. So nice to have confirmation that coho spawned successfully in this urban creek last autumn, and that their eggs are hatching out.

coho fry Byrne Creek
There were several dozen fry hanging in a pool under this log in the lower ravine. There were also four or five smolt-size fish there too, either coho yearlings or resident cutthroat trout. I didn’t see them eat any fry while I was there, but I have observed that in other years.

Frisky Killdeer on Boundary Bay

We followed up the Centennial Beach visit with a walk along the dyke at Boundary Bay. I heard killdeer, and soon we saw an amorous couple frolicking before mating.

killdeer boundary bay
Beauty!

killdeer boundary bay
Displaying before a prospective mate

killdeer boundary bay
Easing in a little closer

killdeer boundary bay
Male jumps on female’s back

killdeer boundary bay
It appeared that only a few seconds is all it takes. They repeated this courtship and mounting a couple of times.