All posts by Paul Cipywnyk

Frisky Killdeer on Boundary Bay

We followed up the Centennial Beach visit with a walk along the dyke at Boundary Bay. I heard killdeer, and soon we saw an amorous couple frolicking before mating.

killdeer boundary bay
Beauty!

killdeer boundary bay
Displaying before a prospective mate

killdeer boundary bay
Easing in a little closer

killdeer boundary bay
Male jumps on female’s back

killdeer boundary bay
It appeared that only a few seconds is all it takes. They repeated this courtship and mounting a couple of times.

New Fishing Licences a Sign of Spring

I bought a BC Non-tidal Angling Licence and a Fisheries and Oceans Canada Tidal Waters Sport Fishing Licence today, both with salmon stamps. Such licences expire at the end of March, and renewing them around this time of year has become a rite of spring.

I am by no means an avid fisherman, but I enjoy hiking, camping, nature photography, streamkeeping and other outdoor activities, so I like having the proper licences if the opportunity arises to wet a line. I have a couple of inexpensive rods and reels, and a small tackle box with an assortment of enough lures and accessories to be suited to most fishing in western Canada.

I have a cousin who loves fishing, and I’m always learning when I go out with him.

I have store-bought canned fish in the cupboard and frozen fish in the freezer, so I figure if I’m eating fish I might as well kill some myself. It’s a reminder that cans and plastic wrap do not insulate us from nature, though nowadays lots of folks have no idea where their food comes from.

Honoured to Speak on Citizen Science & Community Groups

I was honoured to speak tonight at the Tommy Douglas Library in SE Burnaby in an event organized by the South Coast Conservation Program called Conservation Through Citizen Engagement on BC’s South Coast.

Pamela Zevit and Tamsin Baker of SCCP provided introductions to their program and the speakers.

Then I spoke about citizen engagement in relation to the Byrne Creek Streamkeepers Society, and shared some thoughts on communicating about local watersheds to citizens, youth, and various levels of government and government agencies.

I didn’t bother with a PowerPoint, just blathered on with my Slavic passion : – ).

Other speakers included DG Blair of the Stewardship Centre for British Columbia, and Monica Pearson of Balance Ecological, who both delivered stimulating, knowledgeable presentations. Great stuff!